More Than Flesh

Through this series of work Gretel has endeavoured to explore the fleeting experiences that make us human. Through focusing closely on the fluidity of the human-anatomy and the flippant relationship between the mind and the body, Gretel has unpicked, celebrated and humanised the ever-changing flesh that we all find ourselves existing in.

Throughout the series there is a thoughtful focus on hands; reflecting

on Aristotle’s definition of the hands being “the tools of tools”. Hands have been depicted in Gretel’s work to symbolise emotions, friendship, power, control and, at times, a lack of.
The hands demonstrate a volatile conflict between beholding the power to create and repair, but also the sinister potential to manufacture ones demise.

From experiencing euphoria and having fun with friends, to finding oneself suffocated by darkness and needing a friend for comfort. Gretel touches on the harsh reality of what it is to be human in todays saturated world; encompassing the magnitude of the ever-changing situations and emotions that our bodies and minds confront. The work is a celebration of movement and resilience; exploring the capabilities that we possess to adapt and transcend our physical appearance. Ultimately encouraging the viewers to reflect and recognise that they are much more than the flesh they exist in.